Poignant Irrelevance

Wednesday, May 03, 2006

base building

i'm floundering without some sort of set running schedule. wouldn't it be great to work on base-building BEFORE marathon training and not DURING it? problem is, i'm not so sure how to do it.

is there a book or a website that will give me some insight? the only schedule i've ever followed was the higdon m training program. i don't know anything else. do i just start running everyday, and follow the 10% rule?

i need a schedule, otherwise its too easy during the week to screw it because i'm tired. i'd hate to burn the remaining weeks before m training sets in by floundering around with no real base building. i can't seem to find anything on the 'net except m schedules. i've researched it, but i can't seem to find advice or schedules for just plain old base building. but maybe i'm looking for the wrong things/schedules?

hmmmmmmmmmmm.. anybody out there have a favorite site or a book you can point me to? any basic theories you like to follow?

i need to put myself on a schedule before i wake up in the middle of june, realizing that i was not able to cultivate any running progress during May. anybody out there have any advice? Thanks!

5 Comments:

  • Why can't you just make it easy on yourself and commit to 3-5 miles Monday through Friday? or 3-5 miles Monday - Thursday and Saturday. Throw a longer run in when you are feeling good. You don't have to refer to a schedule - you don't have to get stressed out about it....

    I have no resources or reference materials to back my suggestion up......just an idea.....

    By Blogger D, at 7:50 AM  

  • Brent, I suggest following the KISS method - keep it simple "stupid."

    Figure out how many miles you can handle a week right now. Divide that by 7. Ex. 35/7 = 5 miles a day. Or divide by 6 with one day off (oh, I can't believe I just typed that).

    Go out and run 4-6 easy to moderate miles every day. Don't worry about long runs, don't worry about a hard/easy approach. Just divide up the effort evenly.

    As you get stronger, increase your daily runs. When in doubt, slow down and run longer. Once you get to the mileage you want to max out at, start varying your daily mileage. Add in a long run and follow it up by a recovery day.

    Listen to your body and don't be afraid to cut back your mileage every 2-4 weeks depending on how your feeling.

    Most of this comes from Ron Daws' Running Your Best which is out of print but sometimes you can get a copy at amazon or abebooks.com.

    If you want a more personal approach - taking into an account a goal race, etc. shoot me an email.

    By Blogger Chad Austin, at 7:52 AM  

  • Brent,
    My two cents - I'm a fan of Lydiard, and credit him with getting me to Boston. I'd suggest working on a 6 day schedule:

    Mon - 30-40 min easy (4.5)
    Tue - 60 min moderate (7.5)
    Wed - 30-40 min easy (4.5)
    Thurs - 45 min fairly hard (5.5)
    Fri - off
    Sat - 90 min easy (11)
    Sun - 60 min moderate (7.5)

    The numbers are my guess on mileages, so this would probably put you around 40, a solid base from which to build. If you feel it's too much, cut the short, easy days to 25-30 min; and the 60 min days to 45's.

    (This is loosely based on a reduced version of Lydiard's beginner's marathon plan in "Running With Lydiard")

    By Blogger Scooter, at 8:21 AM  

  • aren't there running clubs in america? Like the ten minute mile club?

    Don't laugh! I saw it on Sex and the City

    You know the episode where Miranda runs with a guy and he takes her home and licks her sweaty bum crack? She freaks out so much that the next run, she tries to get away from him and actually runs faster boosting her into the 9 minute mile group! Please don't tell me there isn't really a running club - it will break my heart!

    By Blogger airlie, at 7:15 AM  

  • Even with a base of 20 - 25 easy miles (5 miles x 4 times a week) you'll be building a solid base from which to start your marathon training. And you'll drop a lot of weight too.

    For a book try "The Complete Book Of Running & Fitness" from the New York Road Runners Club.

    By Blogger Josh, at 9:18 AM  

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